ArchDaily: “Spotlight – Carol Ross Barney”

ArchDaily publishes a spotlight on the work of Design Principal and Founder Carol Ross Barney. “Few architects have had a greater influence on civic design and the public realm.”

“Advocating that excellent design is a right, not a privilege, Carol’s career is marked by her sensitivity. Born in Chicago, Illinois on April 12, 1949, her work is characterized by a desire to bring dignity to the needs of users and the public alike. With a career that spans over 40 years, Carol founded her firm Ross Barney Architects in 1981. She is known for shaping the built environment, the profession, and architectural education. As an architect, urbanist, mentor, and educator, her work upholds a deep commitment to people and place…

Following her service in the Peace Corps, Carol joined Holabird and Root. Shortly after joining, she received an invitation from Gertrude Lempp Kerbis, FAIA: ‘Come and meet other female architects re: Coalition – all invited’. The group that convened that evening would found Chicago Women in Architecture; an organization that has become a leading advocacy group for women in the profession. As a founding member and first president, Carol embedded a sense of responsibility to seek equity. At Holabird and Root, Carol met mentor John A. Holabird, FAIA. With John, Carol worked for what he called ‘noble clients’, the ones with important cultural or social agendas but not necessarily the most money or high profile projects. The work ranged from the 1979 AIA Institute Honor Award winning restoration of the Chicago Public Library and Cultural Center to the Oakbrook Village Hall…

Carol’s process is rooted in inclusivity. Empowered by a sense of responsibility, she has chosen to fight for the collective aspirations of society. This confidence exists on a sense of ownership; that she too will use the spaces she designs and interacts with. What some might consider everyday spaces, ones that do not need to be designed, have an immeasurable impact on quality of life. These are the spaces Carol cares deeply about. It is this belief that makes her the ‘People’s Architect’.”

Read the full article at archdaily.com.