Architect’s Newspaper – July 4 roundup

Two projects are included in Architect’s Newspaper July 4th roundup – The Chicago Riverwalk, and Ass(et) Creek; noted for their grand public space and river restoration.

Six of America’s newest and grandest public spaces: “From a highly anticipated river revitalization project in Chicago to a completely repurposed mall site in a tiny Connecticut town, projects revolving around public spaces are always feel-good stories. Who doesn’t enjoy a new, clean space to people-watch? Or better yet, catch some July 4 fireworks? The Architect’s Newspaper picked six completed projects that exemplify what a good public space entails…

The recent completion of Phase III of Chicago’s downtown riverfront redevelopment featured a new mile-and-a-half public park, the Riverwalk. Led by Chicago-based Ross Barney Architects and Watertown, Massachusetts–based Sasaki Associates, the Riverwalk is divided into separate “rooms” between the bascule bridges and has a large interactive water plaza. Previous phases led to new development along the water, including restaurants, bars, and the River Theater, a staircase-ramp bridging upper Wacker Drive and the river. This latest development is part of an overall goal to completely overhaul the Chicago River, with an aim of a clean, swimmable river by 2040.”

Check out the other five projects at archpaper.com.

From sea to shining sea: six projects restoring the U.S.’s ecosystem: “As the threat of climate change and sea level rise becomes more pressing, projects looking to save our country’s ecosystems have never been more important. The relationship between water and a city’s landscape has become especially critical for all urbanists (see our water issue, which explored this in-depth). The six projects and proposals listed below aim to repair America’s ecosystems and bring us closer to the environment…

A clean Chicago River: a dream too good to be true? Ross Barney Architects disagrees, and may well be bringing that vision to life. The firm has dedicated extensive studies on how to transform the South Side neighborhood’s currently polluted river into an urban natural space with amenities that residents need. They even envision a water-taxi stop at the site to provide a direct connection to downtown.”

Check out the other five projects at archpaper.com.